Haunted Hawaii: artist creates spooky sculptures in his back yard

Ismael Cantu and his family spend all year creating a one-night, annual haunted yard in Kauai, Hawaii. Continue reading Haunted Hawaii: artist creates spooky sculptures in his back yard

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Worms as workers, and other garden tips

Worms as workers, and other garden tips

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Jaro Spichal at his worm farm in Moloa’a, Kauai.

MOLOAA — Jaro Spichal says he’s in the business of multiplying microbes.

But, the Moloaa man grows more than bacteria and fungus at his farm nestled in the midst of noni tree groves on Kauai’s East Side.

Spichal is the owner of Kauai Worms and he’s on a mission to help the island’s farmers and gardeners amp up their production with worm castings and compost.

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Old style restoration at Waipa Foundation

Old style restoration at Waipa Foundation

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Matt Rosener, project manager for the Waipa Stream Restoration Project.

WAIPA — O’opu fish have come back to spawn in the Waipa Stream after dense thickets of hau bush were removed, helping to restore the water flow.

The fish are integral to Hawaiian culture, with four species of o’opu that were favored for eating and the fifth that was believed to be related to the mo’o, or lizard gods.

They’ve been missing from Waipa Stream since water diversions that came with Kauai’s development changed  stream flow and things like hau bush to took over.

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Salvinia Smackdown: Kauai tackles invasive plant

Salvinia Smackdown: Kauai tackles invasive plant

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Dan Lager, with the state Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Aquatic Resources, helps clean salvinia out of the Kilauea River.

KILAUEA, HI — This plant can take over a river from just one leaf.

It starts along the banks and forms a thick mat across the top of the water, blocking sunlight and changing the ecosystem underneath as it grows.

And with Kauai’s connected waterways, it is currently spreading without remorse.

“Salvinia starves the river of sunlight and oxygen, but also when it decomposes, it falls to the bottom and changes the system; turns it into more marshy,” said Justin Goggins, biologist with the state Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Aquatic Resources.

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